Okay, let's get back to the bragging about marbles incident. Consider how such modesty may affect your ability to compete in the NFL and seriously limit your lifetime earning power. When was the last time you saw a name tag that read, “Manager...shhhhh...don't tell anyone.”

 

Then there's the issue of leadership qualities. Have you ever sat before a blank screen and tried to draft your resumé? You know how uncomfortable it makes you to refer to yourself as having good management skills? I mean, you did organize those bathroom supplies methodically once you got the toilets swabbed, right?

 

Or how about when you signed up for that dating site and it asked you to share a bit about yourself. How do you know that special someone might not be justifiably impressed that you were the 4th grade spelling champion? After all, good spelling ability is one of those skills that comes in handy when you write that excuse for your kid's school and helps keep you from being audited.

 

Would you seriously vote for any president who wasn't so full of himself that he couldn't hold his own against an arrogant dictator or two?

 

Okay, now to the minister; this is, after all, the man who professes to know what God is thinking, right? Where's the humility in that?

 

I propose we become outright braggarts. Let's teach our kids to foster self-confidence by posting good grades on the football scoreboard. Encourage creativity by awarding a trophy for the best lie about where they were while skipping school.

 

After all, we could use a few more people in Congress who can add, right? How will we know who to elect if they don't brag a little?

Arrogance is Sadly Under-rated

 

Mothers, ministers and teachers everywhere will tell you that humility is a valuable quality. As a child you were likely raised to accept praise with a quiet “thank you” and told not to brag to your friends when you beat the bully down the block at marbles. What did that get you? I submit that arrogance is a much more productive quality.

 

Let's take that quiet “thank you.” That set you up for a lifetime of trying to please people and blind compliance. You study television commercials that hype their products to cure you of deficiencies such as home cooking, feminine curves and last year's sofa that still looks pretty good but isn't in this year's pumpkin color. You ask your doctor about taking that new medicine that's supposed to give you sleeker toe nails, at the expense of lymphoma and lack of sexual interest. I ask you now; what good are sleek toe nails if you're not wanting sex?

 

 

 

 

 

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